As President Trump reacts to Pyongyang’s nuclear belligerence against the U.S. with a threat of unleashing “fire and fury” on North Korea, local governments have begun worrying about whether they should revive a fixture of the darkest days of the Cold War — the civil defense plan.

Duck-and-cover drills and backyard fallout shelters are unlikely to come back in vogue. But the possibility that North Korea could drop a nuclear bomb on the Bay Area or other West Coast urban center — capabilities that Kim Jung Un’s regime is thought to be close to achieving — raises questions about how those who survive an attack would survive the aftermath.

Emergency managers of big cities are discussing how to address the threat of an attack if the “horrible thing actually happens,” said Michael Dayton, deputy director for emergency services for San Francisco’s Department of Emergency Management.

“I don’t know if anybody is doing it well right now,” Dayton said. “An intercontinental ballistic missile is a new concern in terms of preventative radiological nuclear detention. … Our previous efforts have focused on what happens if a bad actor got ahold of a dirty bomb and set it off on the Golden Gate Bridge.”

“I don’t know if anybody is doing it well right now,” Dayton said. “An intercontinental ballistic missile is a new concern in terms of preventative radiological nuclear detention. … Our previous efforts have focused on what happens if a bad actor got ahold of a dirty bomb and set it off on the Golden Gate Bridge.”

The tension level with North Korea increased sharply Tuesday. The Washington Post first reported that the Defense Intelligence Agency believes Pyongyang has developed a miniaturized nuclear warhead that could be carried by an intercontinental ballistic missile, the type that could reach the West Coast of the U.S.

Then, President Trump told reporters: “North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States. They will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen.”

The blast from a nuclear missile like the one North Korea is believed to be close to possessing would create a fireball a mile in diameter, with temperatures as hot as the sun’s surface and winds greater than a hurricane’s force, according to the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. Radioactive fallout would be scattered over hundreds of miles. Continue reading.